Surface partitioning in organic–inorganic mixtures contributes to the size-dependence of the phase-state of atmospheric nanoparticles

Werner, J.; Dalirian, M.; Walz, M.-M.; Ekholm, V.; Wideqvist, U.; Lowe, S. J.; Öhrwall, G.; Persson, I.; Riipinen, I.; Björneholm, O.
2016 | Environ. Sci. Technol.

Extensive organohalogen contamination in wildlife from a site in the Yangtze River Delta

Zhou, YH; Asplund, L; Yin, G; Athanassiadis, I; Wideqvist, U; Bignert, A; Qiu, YL; Zhu, ZL; Zhao, JF; Bergman, A
2016 | Sci. Total Environ. | 554 (320-328)
The environmental and human health concerns for organohalogen contaminants (OHCs) extend beyond the 23 persistent organic pollutants (POPs) regulated by the Stockholm Convention. The current, intense industrial production and use of chemicals in China and their bioaccumulation makes Chinese wildlife highly suitable for the assessment of legacy, novel and emerging environmental pollutants. In the present study, six species of amphibians, fish and birds were sampled from paddy fields in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) were screened for OHCs. Some extensive contamination was found, both regarding number and concentrations of the analytes, among the species assessed. High concentrations of chlorinated paraffins were found in the snake, Short-tailed mamushi (range of 200-340 mu g g(-1) lw), Peregrine falcon (8-59 mu g g(-1) lw) and Asiatic toad (97 mu g g(-1) lw). Novel contaminants and patterns were observed; octaCBs to decaCB made up 20% of the total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) content in the samples and new OHCs, substituted with 5-8 chlorines, were found but are not yet structurally confirmed. In addition, Dechlorane 602 (DDC-DBF) and numerous other OHCs (DDTs, hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexbromocyclododecane (HBCDD), chlordane, heptachlor, endosulfan and Mirex) were found in all species analyzed. These data show extensive chemical contamination of wildlife in the YRD with a suite of OHCs with both known and unknown toxicities, calling for further indepth studies. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

Surface Partitioning in Organic-Inorganic Mixtures Contributes to the Size-Dependence of the Phase-State of Atmospheric Nanoparticles

Werner, J; Dalirian, M; Walz, MM; Ekholm, V; Wideqvist, U; Lowe, SJ; Ohrwal, G; Persson, I; Riipinen, I; Bjorneholm, O
2016 | Environ. Sci. Technol. | 50 (14) (7434-7442)
298.15 k , activity-coefficients , aerosol-particles , aqueous-solution , cloud droplet activation , dicarboxylic-acids , ray photoelectron-spectroscopy , slightly soluble organics , succinic acid , thermodynamic model

Atmospheric particulate matter is one of the main factors governing the Earth's radiative budget, but its exact effects on the global climate are still uncertain. Knowledge on the molecular-scale surface phenomena as well as interactions between atmospheric organic and inorganic compounds is necessary for understanding the role of airborne nanoparticles in the Earth system. In this work, surface composition of aqueous model systems containing succinic acid and sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate is determined using a novel approach combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, surface tension measurements and thermodynamic modeling. It is shown that succinic acid molecules are accumulated in the surface, yielding a 10-fold surface concentration as compared with the bulk for saturated succinic acid solutions. Inorganic salts further enhance this enrichment due to competition for hydration in the bulk. The surface compositions for various mixtures are parametrized to yield generalizable results and used to explain changes in surface tension. The enhanced surface partitioning implies an increased maximum solubility of organic compounds in atmospheric nanoparticles. The results can explain observations of size-dependent phase-state of atmospheric nanoparticles, suggesting that these particles can display drastically different behavior than predicted by bulk properties only.

Hygroscopic growth and cloud forming potential of Arctic aerosol based on observed chemical and physical characteristics (a 1 year study 2007-2008)

Silvergren, S.; Wideqvist, U.; Ström, J.; Sjögren, S.; Svenningsson, B.
2014 | J. Geophys. Res.-Atmos. | 119 (14080)

Seasonal variation of aerosol water uptake and its impact on the direct radiative effect at Ny-Alesund, Svalbard

Rastak, N; Silvergren, S; Zieger, P; Wideqvist, U; Strom, J; Svenningsson, B; Maturilli, M; Tesche, M; Ekman, AML; Tunved, P; Riipinen, I
2014 | Atmos. Chem. Phys. | 14 (14) (7445-7460)

In this study we investigated the impact of water uptake by aerosol particles in ambient atmosphere on their optical properties and their direct radiative effect (ADRE, W m(-2)) in the Arctic at Ny-Alesund, Svalbard, during 2008. To achieve this, we combined three models, a hygroscopic growth model, a Mie model and a radiative transfer model, with an extensive set of observational data. We found that the seasonal variation of dry aerosol scattering coefficients showed minimum values during the summer season and the beginning of fall (July-August-September), when small particles (< 100 nm in diameter) dominate the aerosol number size distribution. The maximum scattering by dry particles was observed during the Arctic haze period (March-April-May) when the average size of the particles was larger. Considering the hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles in the ambient atmosphere had a significant impact on the aerosol scattering coefficients: the aerosol scattering coefficients were enhanced by on average a factor of 4.30 +/- 2.26 (mean +/- standard deviation), with lower values during the haze period (March-April-May) as compared to summer and fall. Hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles was found to cause 1.6 to 3.7 times more negative ADRE at the surface, with the smallest effect during the haze period (March-April-May) and the highest during late summer and beginning of fall (July-August-September).

Terpene acids on aerosol particles from boreal coniferous forests in Hyytiälä, Finland

Wideqvist, U.; Janson, R.; Alsberg, T.
2005

Real-World Traffic Emission Factors of Gases and Particles Measured in a Road Tunnel in Stockholm, Sweden.

Kristensson, A.; Johansson, C.; Westerholm, R.; Swietlicki, E.; Gidhagen, L.; Wideqvist, U.; Vesely, V.
2004 | Atmos. Environ. | 38 (657-673)
aerosol , bap , benzene , nox , pah , size distribution , ultrafine particles , voc

Mätningar och beräkningar av vedeldningens påverkan på luftföroreningshalter, del 2 Växjö.

Johansson, C.; Hedberg, E.; Olivares, G.; Gidhagen, L.; Karlsson, H.; Wideqvist, U.; Vesely, V.; E. Swietlicki, A. Kristensson; J. Zhou, J. Rissler; P. Brohammer, E. Brorström-Lundén; K. Peterson, M. Remberger; A. Potter, E. Junedahl; K. Persson, K. Sjöberg; E. Sellin-Lindgren, J. Jacobsson; C. Tranefors, L. Andersson; E. Eltahir, G. Omstedt; J. Langner, V Foltescu; M. Pettersson, R. Ahlinder; B. Sjövall, B. Norberg
2004 | ITM, SU | ISBN: ISSN 1103-341X | Report No: 125
bap , bensene , emissions , nox , pah , particles , pm10 , so2 , voc , wood burning

Mätningar och beräkningar av påverkan på luftföroreningshalter, del 1 Lycksele.

Johansson, C.; Hedberg, E.; Olivares, G.; Gidhagen, L.; Karlsson, H.; Wideqvist, U.; Vesely, V.; E. Swietlicki, A. Kristensson; J. Zhou, J. Rissler; P. Brohammer, E. Brorström-Lundén; K. Peterson, M. Remberger; A. Potter, E. Junedahl; K. Persson, K. Sjöberg; E. Sellin-Lindgren, J. Jacobsson; C. Tranefors, L. Andersson; E. Eltahir, G. Omstedt; J. Langner, V Foltescu; M. Pettersson, R. Ahlinder; B. Sjövall, B. Norberg
2004 | ITM, SU | ISBN: ISSN 1103-341X | Report No: 124
bap , bensene , concentrations , emissions , levoglucosan , no2 , nox , number of particles , pah , particles , pm10 , potassium , so2 , voc , wood burning

Comparison of measurement methods for benzene and toluene.

Wideqvist, U.; Vesely, V.; Johansson, C.; Brorström-Lundén, E.; Sjöberg, K.; Jonsson, T.
2003 | Atmos. Environ. | 37 (1963-1973)
btx , diffusion , passive sampling , tenax , uptake rate

Contact information

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Geovetenskapens Hus,
Svante Arrhenius väg 8, Stockholm

Arrheniuslaboratoriet, Svante Arrhenius väg 16, Stockholm (Unit for Analytical and Toxicological Chemistry)

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Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry (ACES)
Stockholm University
106 91 Stockholm

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Stella Papadopoulou
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stella.papadopoulou@aces.su.se