Most studies do not allow distinguishing plastic-specific effects from those caused by other particles, such as clay and cellulose. Picture: Zandra Gerdes

Hazards of microplastic exposure to animals uncertain

Microplastic and natural particles affect animals in similar ways, which makes evaluating the hazards of microplastics difficult, shows a new study by researchers from ACES and AquaBiota Water Research. These findings imply that unless we identify how and why microplastics differ from natural particles in their interaction with animals, we cannot be certain of how harmful they are. The study …

Land use affects climate more than previously thought

Forestry and pasturage have a much greater impact on the climate than previously thought. The ability of forests to store carbon dioxide decreases when people use them or let animals out to graze in them, and this usually applies to forestry and not just deforestation. This is shown in a study published by ACES researchers and their colleagues in Vienna, …

Phase-out of perfluorinated substances in North America and Europe shows promise for reducing impact on health but not the environment

The concentrations of a number of perfluorinated substances are currently on the decrease in humans in North America and Europe. However, in the environment, the same substances show no change. A team of researchers at ACES, completed a systematic review of how the concentrations of perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) have been affected in the environment and in humans since their phase-out …

New method promises to cut down animal testing in carcinogen studies

Researchers at ACES have developed a new method that can potentially reduce animal experiments used to evaluate the risk of carcinogenic chemicals. The new study was published in the journal Scientific Reports. Humans are exposed to chemicals, for instance via food and dust, that can be metabolized into carcinogenic compounds upon entering the body. These compounds, even at very low …

Assistant Professor Claudia Mohr, ACES

Claudia Mohr is one of Wallenberg Academy Fellows 2017

Assistant Professor Claudia Mohr is one of the Wallenberg Academy Fellows 2017. Claudia, previously at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany, joined ACES in May 2017. Emissions from vehicles, air travel and industry affect the formation of clouds in the atmosphere. Claudia will conduct detailed studies of how water vapor condenses around aerosol particles or airborne particles, to better …

ACES researcher secures major grant for tackling uncertainties in climate change research

ACES professor Örjan Gustafsson received 50 million SEK (€5 million) from the Swedish Research Council for a ten-year research project to tackle two major areas of uncertainty in climate research. The award is part of the Distinguished Professors Grant programme that aims to “create conditions for the most distinguished researchers to conduct long-term, innovative research with great potential to achieve …

ACES receives more than 4 million euros in external research funding

Twelve researchers at ACES received a combined 44,3 million SEK (€4,4 million) in external research funding in fiscal year 2017. The Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsrådet) and The Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning (Formas) awarded 12,6- and 18 million SEK (€1,2 million and €1,8 million), respectively, while 29,9 million SEK (€2,9 million) were awarded to a …

Participants of "Climate science at high latitudes," held at the Hyytiälä Forestry Field Station in Southern Finland. Photo: Juho Aalto

Report from the first Nordic workshop on e-science tools for climate research

The 10-day workshop on e-science tools for climate research called “Atmospheric science at high latitudes: Online data storage and visualization tools” was successfully held at the Hyytiälä Forestry Field Station in southern Finland between 23 October – 2 November 2017. This workshop was the first in a series of three workshops led by Stockholm University (ACES) in collaboration with the …

Study confirms thiamine deficiency behind the eider population decline in Sweden

Lethal deficiency of thiamine (vitamin B1) is widespread among wildlife over large geographical areas in the Northern Hemisphere. Now, researchers from ACES with colleagues from the Swedish National Veterinary Institute show that there is a direct link between thiamine deficiency and the population decline in the common eider in Sweden. Their results are published in the journal Scientific Reports. Thiamine …

Assistant Professor Claudia Mohr, ACES

ACES researcher received prestigious early career award

Assistant Professor Claudia Mohr has been awarded the AS Division Outstanding Early Career Scientist Award of the European Geosciences Union (EGU). Early Career Scientist Award recipients, who are normally from both European and non-European countries, have been selected for ”their important contributions to the Earth, planetary and space sciences.”  “I am very happy and honoured to receive this award. The …

ACES researcher contributes to climate report presented in the UN

It is possible to limit global warming to less than two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, but only if the world takes fast action. This is the conclusion in a new report written by 33 leading climate scientists and climate advisors. The report “Well Under 2 Degrees Celsius. Fast Action Policies to Protect People and the Planet from Extreme Climate …

Contact information

Visiting addresses:

Geovetenskapens Hus,
Svante Arrhenius väg 8, Stockholm

Arrheniuslaboratoriet, Svante Arrhenius väg 16, Stockholm (Unit for Analytical and Toxicological Chemistry)

Mailing address:
Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry (ACES)
Stockholm University
106 91 Stockholm

Press enquiries should be directed to:

Annika Hallman
Science Communicator
Phone +46 (0)8 16 15 53
Mobile +46 (0)70 664 22 64
annika.hallman@aces.su.se